Erik Reardon

Erik Reardon

Erik Reardon joined the Housatonic Valley Association as the Berkshire Watershed Director on February 1st, 2024. Erik grew up in the Merrimack River Valley north of Boston where he first discovered his love for the outdoors, fishing nearby rivers and streams, exploring the local town forest, and hiking in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Erik’s love for the outdoors and appreciation for wilderness spaces later carried over into other aspects of his life, including his academic career. Erik studies environmental history at the University of Maine where, in 2016, he earned a PhD focused on the historic dimensions of dam removal and fisheries restoration in New England. He later served as a Visiting Assistant Professor of history and environmental studies at Colby College and Bates College in Maine. In July of 2021, his book, Managing the River Commons: Fishing and New England's Rural Economy, was published by the University of Massachusetts Press. Recently, Erik also worked with the Adirondack Experience Museum, the Wild Center, the Nature Conservancy, and the Adirondack Diversity Initiative to develop and direct a collaborative, public-facing project series titled “Adirondacks for All” which explored the region’s history and present-day reality through an expansive lens of environmental justice. A documentary of the same name will soon air on Mountain Lake PBS.

Within both academia and the environmental non-profit sector, Erik has experience with project management, program development, and public outreach. His work centers on a professional and personal commitment to land and water conservation, environmental stewardship, and expanding access to outdoor recreation. In his spare time, Erik enjoys getting outside, running trails, and fly-fishing rivers and streams across the northeast. Erik is excited to learn more about the Berkshires' amazing natural features, diverse opportunities for outdoor recreation, and community experiences that contribute to the region’s unique sense of place: the forests, mountains, freshwater ecosystems, craft beer, and local music and arts scene, just to name a few.